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Fates Warning – Awaken The Guardian (1986)

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While The Spectre Within was already a landmark release for both (often closely related) power and “progressive” metal enthusiasts, Awaken the Guardian pushes the formula for each further. In many cases, it trades in overall heaviness and aggression for extra songwriting and instrumental complexity. I’m certain it won’t be replacing its predecessor in your library, but that doesn’t mean it can’t find a place on its own merits, right? Awaken the Guardian shares a high level of critical praise with its illustrious predecessor, and for good reason.

Outside of swapping co-founder Victor Arduini for Frank Aresti (a guitarist who has performed on most of the band’s work since this album), Fates Warning retains the same lineup as on The Spectre Within and despite the overall aesthetic shift employs about the same musical techniques as before. The more complex arrangements give the non-Johns in the band more of a chance to show off their chops, though. The rhythm section seems to have improved their chops the most, driving songs with lots of offbeat percussion and time signature shifts, and coordinating more effectively with John Arch’s vocals, which are still album and band defining. Arch’s technique, at the very least, hasn’t changed much, but the improved prowess of the band definitely complements him nicely.

While the musicians lend this duology of albums their share of unity, Awaken the Guardian‘s tonal shift is enough of a contrast that it concealed this from me for many a mystic moon. As much as I should probably avoid hokey, vaguely mystical fantasy language when trying to discuss what’s going on under this album’s surface, every aspect of this album ratchets up said aesthetic. To be fair, the lyrics sometimes use the tropes in question not specifically to tell legendary tales, but instead to take pot shots at the ’80s culture surrounding the Fates (read: “Valley of the Dolls”). This is more of a contrast with Ray Alder’s incarnation of Fates Warning, which is beyond my knowledge but presumably takes a different approach. Anyways, judging exactly how well Fates Warning is realizing this aesthetic is kind of difficult, but the lyrical side of things holds up pretty well. Sometimes, the actual words get a bit stream of consciousness for my tastes, but the creative and colorful narratives and overall imagery still give them a respectably high place on the Walkyier scale, which I totally didn’t just make up now and is definitely a valid way of comparing the overall merits of metal lyricists, right?

Odd asides aside, when I like and value a metal album, I have this tendency to say it straight out at the beginning of the review. Those of you who have made it far have almost certainly made the purchase, whether it be 30 years or seconds ago.

Highlights: “The Sorceress”, “Guardian”, “Prelude to Ruin”

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